MLS® data confirms that the ratio of sales of detached homes compared to strata has flipped in only five years.

Our infograph shows that in 2015, sales of single-family detached homes represented 60 per cent of Fraser Valley’s main residential market. The combined sales of townhomes and apartments picked up 40 per cent. In comparison to year-to-date sales for 2019, that ratio has now reversed. Combined sales of attached homes now garner 60.4 per cent of our market and detached, 39.6 per cent.  

Fraser Valley REALTORS® have been watching the shift towards multi-family housing units for many years now. A myriad of factors impact housing demand, from geography and land scarcity, to population growth and economic conditions. The geographical limitations of being fenced in by the North Shore Mountains, the Strait of Georgia, the border with the United States and the Agricultural Land Reserve in the Fraser Valley, have necessitated a shift in the housing stock toward higher density projects. 

The other main reason behind the shift is affordability. Since the introduction of the federal government’s mortgage stress test January of last year, the typical borrower now qualifies for about 18 to 20 per cent less than they used to.  Taking a typical detached home in the Fraser Valley as an example, instead of being able to afford a home that costs $964,600 (the benchmark price in April), they can now only afford a home that costs a little over $735,000. 

For buyers, the only option is to save more money or consider buying a smaller or less expensive home. The trend towards attached is here to stay. Given the rapidly growing population of the Fraser Valley, a push for increased density as land supply becomes even more constrained is anticipated. That means that attached housing will become an increasingly important part of the Fraser Valley market and we expect that its share of sales will continue to grow.

Read full post

Do you have noisy neighbours disturbing your peace? Or perhaps you want to play music but are getting complaints?

 

Of all the compromises that come with condo ownership, living with noise might be the biggest. Although most strata corporations have bylaws restricting noise and other forms of nuisance, it can be difficult for owners and strata councils to figure out when the noises of everyday life cross the line and become legitimate complaints.

 

From a legal perspective, making a noise that impacts another person’s quiet enjoyment of their property can be considered nuisance. The challenging comes down to figuring out what level or noise or interference is reasonable. We all experience life subjectively and what bothers one person may be entirely acceptable to another.

 

If you believe that a neighbour’s noise is affecting your ability to enjoy your home, look for ways to create evidence in support of your noise complaint. Take recordings of the noise if you can. Keep a journal of the timing, frequency and nature of the disturbances.

 

The simplest and most cost-effective way to resolve noise disputes is to work with neighbours and strata council to determine whether the noise is normal and to look for ways to minimize the disturbance. If extending an olive branch doesn’t work, you may have legal remedies. Most of the time, owners have a right to the quiet enjoyment of their property. If you believe that your neighbour or your strata corporation are failing to respect your rights, or are unfairly targeting you, speak with a strata lawyer to review your matter and provide you with qualified legal advice.

 

Read full post
The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.